Posts Tagged ‘Renewables’

December 22, 2010 | 2:53 pm

ADAGE Mason County Project Achieves Permitting Milestone

On Tuesday, December 21, the Olympic Region Clear Air Agency staff recommended approval of the Notice of Construction permit for the ADAGE Mason County biomass facility in Shelton, Wash. This decision is a significant step for the planned nominal 65 Megawatt woody biomass project validating that the state-of-the-art emissions control technology will meet all state and federal air quality standards. Click here for full details of the ORCAA announcement.

ADAGE applauds ORCAA for the extensive review and analysis of the Mason County project. The ORCAA recommendation clearly documents that ADAGE will employ the Best Available Control Technology producing some of the lowest emissions rates for any biomass facility in the State of Washington and nationwide. ORCAA’s review confirms the requirements of the project to protect public health and welfare, specifically, the most vulnerable populations such as those suffering from asthma and the elderly. Visit the ORCAA website for the full draft permit.

The Mason County facility will bring jobs and economic development to Shelton, while delivering base-load, carbon-neutral renewable electricity for over 40,000 homes. This is another key milestone for the project that will enable better utilization of forest residues on the Olympic Peninsula. For more information on the ADAGE Mason County project visit the project website.

November 10, 2010 | 6:21 pm

AREVA Building US Jobs in the Biomass Industry

The renewable energy industry is not just about generating clean energy, it is also about generating clean energy jobs and economic development in our communities.

AREVA has a stated commitment to building domestic supply chains in support of our renewable energy projects. Today’s announcement of a Community Workforce Agreement (CWA) is tangible evidence of that ongoing commitment.

The agreement with the Olympia Vicinity Building and Construction Trades Council ensures that the hundreds of jobs created during construction of ADAGE’s 55-megawatt biopower facility in Shelton, Washington, will be filled with local labor from the area’s 15 construction trade unions.

ADAGE is a joint venture between AREVA and Duke Energy to build biomass power plants in the United States.

Under the CWA, labor activities include site preparation, construction of the biomass boiler, steam turbine, and balance-of-plant mechanical equipment, and electrical installation for the power block. The project is expected to create more than 400 direct jobs during construction and more than 100 direct jobs during permanent operation. In total, the facility represents a $250 million initial investment in Mason County.

Renewable energy powering local clean energy jobs—read the full article here.

November 9, 2010 | 8:35 pm

U.S. Offshore Wind in the Works

By Curtis Roberts

When you’re hard about the task creating an industry from scratch, it’s good to pause on occasion and see where you are.

William Pentland provides such a snapshot in his Forbes “Clean Beta” post yesterday about the slow pace of the U.S. offshore wind industry, and its potential momentum. He says,

“While Europe has installed nearly 1,000 wind turbines offshore since Denmark built the world’s first offshore wind farm in 1991, the U.S. has not installed a single offshore wind turbine.

That is likely to change soon.”

read more…

June 14, 2010 | 8:43 pm

Answers to Biomass Questions

The recent announcement of the proposed ADAGE biopower plant in Mason County, Wash., generated a few questions.

Questions like: What, exactly, is biomass? Will it create jobs for the folks who live here? How will it impact our environment and local infrastructure? What about the air and water?

All good questions … and all answered in detail, along with many others, at these two websites:

biopowerfacts.com and adagebiopower.com/washington

You can also view and download a wide range of reference materials and link to information on academic, government and other organizations’ websites.

After looking over the information, send us your thoughts and sign up to receive emailed updates on the ADAGE Washington site. If we didn’t answer your question, send it to us and we’ll post an update.

January 26, 2010 | 4:08 pm

AREVA Inc. CEO Offers View on Standards for Renewables and Grid Interconnection

Jacques Besnainou AREVA Inc. CEO

Jacques Besnainou AREVA Inc. CEO

In the January edition of Electroindustry—a publication from the National Electrical Manufacturers Association—AREVA Inc. CEO Jacques Besnainou discusses how changes in renewable energy and grid standards are an essential part of transforming the U.S. energy sector.

“But, while everyone agrees the outcome from Copenhagen may take a few years to be ratified and implemented, it is encouraging that many countries, including the U.S., Canada, EU, and China, are moving forward with their own actions to lower their carbon footprints and transition to low-carbon economies.”

Besnainou points out that in addition to federal actions, some states have adopted Renewable Portfolio Standards (PRS), “which together constitute another key driver of renewable energy.”

“Many states in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions have expressed interest in offshore wind. We have seen similar interest in coastal provinces of Eastern Canada. AREVA, as part of a strong commitment to supplying the world with clean, CO2-free energy, is making significant investments in offshore wind in the U.S. and Canada. We believe that standards will make offshore wind a sustainable market and we are encouraged by the projections from the American and Canadian Wind Associations.”

Equally important in the development of renewable energy is the need for “interconnection standards that eliminate barriers to connecting offshore and onshore wind plants to transmission systems. The existing grid interconnection standards must continue to evolve and be flexible as the technology advances.”

Read the rest of the piece “Standards Increase Renewable Energy, Facilitate Grid Interconnection,” on page 3 here.

For more information about what AREVA is doing in renewable energy and offshore wind can also be found here.

January 22, 2010 | 5:02 pm

A QUESTION OF AMERICAN LEADERSHIP

We think these are a very good series of questions… and are proud to among the companies and organizations asking them.

American Leadership

January 14, 2010 | 7:25 pm

AREVA Building Biomass as Part of the Clean Energy Solution

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility
AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility
AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

By Katherine Berezowskyj

What does a recipe for sugar, rice and eucalyptus make?  Not a new culinary dish, but several hundred megawatts of reliable, affordable renewable energy.  In fact, sugar cane bagasse (stalks, husks, etc.), rice husks, and eucalyptus branches and leaves are all used in biomass facilities to produce clean, sustainable energy.
And AREVA has just been awarded three contacts for biomass facilities that use these materials to produce power in Brazil and Thailand.
Through its subsidiary Koblitz, AREVA has signed a contract for the construction of 11 turnkey biomass plants for Brazil.  These plants, which will use eucalyptus, will have a total output capacity of 380 megawatts and is expected to take about four years to build.  Also in Brazil, AREVA will retrofit the power generation unit which uses materials from a sugar mill in the Alagoas state.  The upgraded unit will generate 50 megawatts of electricity.
In Thailand, AREVA has won a contract to build two turnkey 10 megawatt biomass plants that will be fueled by rice husks.
AREVA has built over 100 units across the globe and is planning to bring this technology and expertise to America.  AREVA is currently working as part of a joint-venture with Duke Energy to build biomass facilities across the United States.  The joint-venture, ADAGE, already has two biomass facilities under development in Florida.  Each of these facilities will produce 700 direct and indirect jobs and enough energy to power 40,000 homes.
The development of this renewable energy source continues to grow.  Bloomberg reported last week that ADAGE “plan(s) to pick U.S. locations for at least three biomass-fueled plants in the next six months to meet demand for energy from renewable sources.”
The press release—AREVA Awarded Contracts in Brazil and Thailand—here (http://www.areva.com/servlet/cp_14_01_2010_bioenergies_fr-c-PressRelease-cid-1261931767339-en.html.
For more information on ADAGE, and to keep up with the latest news, check out the site (http://www.adagebiopower.com).

By Katherine Berezowskyj

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

What does a recipe for sugar, rice and eucalyptus make?  Not a new culinary dish, but several hundred megawatts of reliable, affordable renewable energy.  In fact, sugar cane bagasse (stalks, husks, etc.), rice husks, and eucalyptus branches and leaves are all used in biomass facilities to produce clean, sustainable energy.

And AREVA has just been awarded three contacts for biomass facilities that use these materials to produce power in Brazil and Thailand.

Through its subsidiary Koblitz, AREVA has signed a contract for the construction of 11 turnkey biomass plants for Brazil.  These plants, which will use eucalyptus, will have a total output capacity of 380 megawatts and is expected to take about four years to build.  Also in Brazil, AREVA will retrofit the power generation unit which uses materials from a sugar mill in the Alagoas state.  The upgraded unit will generate 50 megawatts of electricity.

In Thailand, AREVA has won a contract to build two turnkey 10 megawatt biomass plants that will be fueled by rice husks.

AREVA has built over 100 units across the globe and is planning to bring this technology and expertise to America.  AREVA is currently working as part of a joint-venture with Duke Energy to build biomass facilities across the United States.  The joint-venture, ADAGE, already has two biomass facilities under development in Florida.  Each of these facilities will produce 700 direct and indirect jobs and enough energy to power 40,000 homes.

The development of this renewable energy source continues to grow.  Bloomberg reported last week that ADAGE “plan(s) to pick U.S. locations for at least three biomass-fueled plants in the next six months to meet demand for energy from renewable sources.”

The press release—AREVA Awarded Contracts in Brazil and Thailand—here.

For more information on ADAGE, and to keep up with the latest news, check out the site.

January 11, 2010 | 2:46 pm

Quote of the Day

Bill Weihl

Bill Weihl

Q. What does the pathway to cheap renewable energy at scale look like? Do you think there’s enough political and societal will to make it happen?

A. As a society, we have chosen to invest too little in alternative energy over the years, and that has made some of the choices much harder than they should be… We should be investing in new wind technologies that promise substantially lower cost. We should be investing in enhanced geothermal, we should be investing in cheaper, safer, cleaner nuclear…. We need to invest across the spectrum.”

– Google’s Energy “Czar” Bill Weihl
from the New York Times from January 7, 2010.

January 7, 2010 | 4:00 pm

Arizona Governor Calls for More Nuclear Power

Governor Jan Brewer

Governor Jan Brewer

And more news about the need for both nuclear energy and renewables, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer “wants more nuclear power for in state.” According to the Associated Press, Brewer said Tuesday that “the state should include more nuclear power plants in its energy portfolio while cutting taxes and government regulation to provide a welcome mat for solar and wind projects encountering “green tape” elsewhere.

Said Brewer, “Memo to California solar industries: Arizona’s door is open, we’ll leave the light on for you.”

Brewer outlined a portfolio of positions and initiatives on energy topics during an address to a regional business summit held at a Phoenix resort.

Arizona already is home to the three-reactor Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station west of Phoenix, and Brewer said she wants to develop more nuclear power.

No new nuclear power plant has been built in the U.S. for decades but economic and environmental factors warrant a new emphasis on that electricity source, Brewer said.

“I believe it’s the wave of the future,” she said.”

Read the rest of the piece by Paul Davenport of the Associated Press here.

January 7, 2010 | 12:56 pm

“Wide range of clean energy plans needed”

An op-ed by AREVA North America CEO Jacques Besnainou that appeared in yesterday’s Tri-City Herald (Wash.).

Jacques Besnainou, AREVA North America CEO

Jacques Besnainou, AREVA North America CEO

“Despite broad support for effective climate legislation, its passage is not certain. Yes, many stakeholders want action. But too many of them are promoting parochial interests at the expense of the greater good.

Some special interest groups focus entirely on energy efficiency. Others are wedded to renewable sources and say no others need apply. Still others are battling for a greater role for biofuels, small hydro, clean coal, nuclear energy or any of a host of others. Which one should the government choose?

My response is that it is not an either/or question. We need a broad range of clean energy alternatives and we need to get moving. While some projects already are under way, a strong climate bill would hasten the development of more clean energy projects and create thousands of additional green jobs.

Rather than advocating and defending so many individual energy “silos,” none of which will solve the problem alone, we should unite behind a holistic approach. We should rally around the broad banner of clean energy, defined as all sources that produce little or no carbon dioxide and have a minimal impact on the environment.
Two areas are particularly promising and deserve priority attention in developing a holistic solution.

The first is renewable energy, especially offshore wind, biomass and solar. Today, renewables account for 3 percent of our energy supply, but there is great potential for growth.

Wind off our coasts is perpetual, continuous and clean. No one can disrupt its supply. Similarly, the sun offers the potential for an inexhaustible source of energy.
The second is nuclear energy, which supplies 20 percent of the nation’s total electricity, but is by far the largest source of CO2-free electricity.

America’s nuclear power sector accounts for nearly 75 percent of our clean air energy, thus any expansion of our nuclear sector would avoid massive volumes of emissions.

But a sizeable number of Americans still harbor fears of nuclear power. Our challenge is to do a better job of informing the publicabout the nuclear industry’s exemplary safety record over the last 50 years.

There are those who suggest that, as we develop a cleaner, more efficient power sector, we must choose between nuclear energy and renewables. This is a false choice, and forcing people to make one would be a huge mistake.

The solution is not nuclear energy or renewables. It is not a focus on energy efficiency or new generation. Finding our way to a low-carbon future means we need more energy efficiency, renewables, nuclear energy and other clean sources if we are to succeed.”

Read the full piece from the Tri-City Herald (Wash.) here.

A version of the op-ed also appeared in Sunday’s Lynchburg (Va.) News & Advance.