Posts Tagged ‘Renewable Energy’

January 14, 2010 | 7:25 pm

AREVA Building Biomass as Part of the Clean Energy Solution

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility
AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility
AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

By Katherine Berezowskyj

What does a recipe for sugar, rice and eucalyptus make?  Not a new culinary dish, but several hundred megawatts of reliable, affordable renewable energy.  In fact, sugar cane bagasse (stalks, husks, etc.), rice husks, and eucalyptus branches and leaves are all used in biomass facilities to produce clean, sustainable energy.
And AREVA has just been awarded three contacts for biomass facilities that use these materials to produce power in Brazil and Thailand.
Through its subsidiary Koblitz, AREVA has signed a contract for the construction of 11 turnkey biomass plants for Brazil.  These plants, which will use eucalyptus, will have a total output capacity of 380 megawatts and is expected to take about four years to build.  Also in Brazil, AREVA will retrofit the power generation unit which uses materials from a sugar mill in the Alagoas state.  The upgraded unit will generate 50 megawatts of electricity.
In Thailand, AREVA has won a contract to build two turnkey 10 megawatt biomass plants that will be fueled by rice husks.
AREVA has built over 100 units across the globe and is planning to bring this technology and expertise to America.  AREVA is currently working as part of a joint-venture with Duke Energy to build biomass facilities across the United States.  The joint-venture, ADAGE, already has two biomass facilities under development in Florida.  Each of these facilities will produce 700 direct and indirect jobs and enough energy to power 40,000 homes.
The development of this renewable energy source continues to grow.  Bloomberg reported last week that ADAGE “plan(s) to pick U.S. locations for at least three biomass-fueled plants in the next six months to meet demand for energy from renewable sources.”
The press release—AREVA Awarded Contracts in Brazil and Thailand—here (http://www.areva.com/servlet/cp_14_01_2010_bioenergies_fr-c-PressRelease-cid-1261931767339-en.html.
For more information on ADAGE, and to keep up with the latest news, check out the site (http://www.adagebiopower.com).

By Katherine Berezowskyj

AREVA Biomass Facility

AREVA Biomass Facility

What does a recipe for sugar, rice and eucalyptus make?  Not a new culinary dish, but several hundred megawatts of reliable, affordable renewable energy.  In fact, sugar cane bagasse (stalks, husks, etc.), rice husks, and eucalyptus branches and leaves are all used in biomass facilities to produce clean, sustainable energy.

And AREVA has just been awarded three contacts for biomass facilities that use these materials to produce power in Brazil and Thailand.

Through its subsidiary Koblitz, AREVA has signed a contract for the construction of 11 turnkey biomass plants for Brazil.  These plants, which will use eucalyptus, will have a total output capacity of 380 megawatts and is expected to take about four years to build.  Also in Brazil, AREVA will retrofit the power generation unit which uses materials from a sugar mill in the Alagoas state.  The upgraded unit will generate 50 megawatts of electricity.

In Thailand, AREVA has won a contract to build two turnkey 10 megawatt biomass plants that will be fueled by rice husks.

AREVA has built over 100 units across the globe and is planning to bring this technology and expertise to America.  AREVA is currently working as part of a joint-venture with Duke Energy to build biomass facilities across the United States.  The joint-venture, ADAGE, already has two biomass facilities under development in Florida.  Each of these facilities will produce 700 direct and indirect jobs and enough energy to power 40,000 homes.

The development of this renewable energy source continues to grow.  Bloomberg reported last week that ADAGE “plan(s) to pick U.S. locations for at least three biomass-fueled plants in the next six months to meet demand for energy from renewable sources.”

The press release—AREVA Awarded Contracts in Brazil and Thailand—here.

For more information on ADAGE, and to keep up with the latest news, check out the site.

December 16, 2009 | 9:29 am

AREVA Leads the Way in Tackling Climate Change, Part II

by Mary Douglas
Reprinted from AREVA Energy Business, Issue 8

Following Copenhagen

Other Carbon-Free Energies

Nuclear is only one option, albeit a key one, among AREVA’s range of carbon-free energy choices. The group is developing synergistic solutions including a range of renewable energies that make sense in a balanced energy mix.

Renewable energy use is increasing worldwide. In emerging countries they supply inexpensive electricity from local resources. In Europe and North America they help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Europe has set an objective of a 20% share for renewable energies in final energy consumption by 2020, and AREVA has technologies capable of supporting that growth.

The group is currently offering its customers a portfolio of four renewable energies: wind power, bioenergy, concentrated solar power, as well as next-generation hydrogen carrier and storage solutions. Several of these have already reached technical maturity, such as wind power and bio energies. They can still be improved in terms of yield and distribution. For example, following its acquisition of 51% of Multibrid in 2007, AREVA has developed pioneering technology to become a leader in the emerging offshore wind power market.

In bioenergy, AREVA is no. 1 in turnkey solutions. The group has built over 100 operating bioenergy power units all over the world, totaling more than 2,800 MWe of installed capacity. AREVA is also reshaping the hydrogen industry by providing CO2-free Hydrogen production. These solutions enable hydrogen to be generated via electrolysis and electricity from fuel cells, with no greenhouse gas emissions.

AREVA is also developing concentrated solar power solutions, which will deliver more than 20% efficiency and grid parity.

Improving Efficiency of Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Management

The cleanest energy is energy that is not used at all. AREVA is working to improve efficiency in both power generation and fuel supply. The aim is to maximize the availability of operating nuclear power plants to produce more energy with the same amount of fuel. It includes working to improve load factors at new reactors such as the state-of-the-art Generation III+ EPR™ reactor.

AREVA's Saint Alban plant in France

AREVA's Saint Alban plant in France

One advantage of this new generation of reactors is its fuel burn-up coefficient. Compared to the previous generation reactor, the EPR™ reduces uranium consumption by 15% for the same amount of electricity generated. In line with its commitment to sustainable development and environmental protection – by making energy more efficient – AREVA is also helping to conserve valuable resources by improving fuel management. Reusable uranium and plutonium are recovered from used fuel for recycling in nuclear reactors as MOX fuel (a mixture of the two materials) or as enriched reprocessed uranium (ERU). Using its advanced technologies, AREVA is therefore able to recycle 96% of the materials contained in used nuclear fuel which significantly reduces the volume and radiotoxicity of final waste to be disposed of. Through its recycling operation, under strict international safeguards, AREVA also supports non-proliferation objectives since used fuel is unloaded from a power plants it can be sent directly to recycling operations and MOX production, avoiding the accumulation and aging of used nuclear fuel at multiple reactor sites worldwide..

Waking to the Dangers

The world is finally awakening to the dangers of climate change, and as a global leader in solutions for CO2-free power generation AREVA is ready to offer its entire portfolio of energy solutions to solve the problems which will increasingly face its customers.

In July, leaders at G8 agreed to at least a 50% reduction in global greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, with developed countries achieving an 80% reduction to ensure that global average temperatures do not rise by more than 2ºC above preindustrial levels.

In October, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu said Washington was “deeply committed” to finding a solution to climate change in the run-up to Copenhagen. “This is a fundamental trust we are about to break if we don’t act as aggressively as we can,” he told a meeting at the IEA in Paris. AREVA is well prepared to meet this challenge.

December 15, 2009 | 11:14 am

AREVA Leads the Way in Tackling Climate Change, Part I

by Mary Douglas
Reprinted from AREVA Energy Business, Issue 8

Following Copenhagen

Climate change is a reality and some of its impacts may already be irreversible. The Catlin Arctic Survey team has found out that most of the ice in the region is first-year ice that will melt next summer. Within a decade, the North Pole will turn into an open sea every summer. Kashmir University’s geology and geophysics department says Indian Kashmir’s glaciers are melting fast because of rising temperatures, threatening the water supply of millions.

AREVA is aware of these challenges and leading the field in offering solutions for CO2-free power generation as delegates from 200 countries prepare to meet in Copenhagen in December, to hammer out a new climate agreement to replace the Kyoto Protocol whose first phase ends in 2012.

With world electricity demand expected to double by 2030, alternatives to fossil fuels must be applied whenever possible to ensure a balanced and reliable energy mix. AREVA is helping to achieve these goals by offering customers a wide-ranging portfolio of both nuclear and “renewable energy” solutions.

International concern

Yvo de Boer, Executive Secretary of the United Nations (UN) Framework Convention on Climate Change says he will be happy if the UN climate conference in Copenhagen (COP15) can deliver on “four essentials”:

  • How much industrialized countrieswill reduce emissions,
  • How much major developing countries will limit the growth of their emissions,
  • How the help needed by developing countries to reduce emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change will be financed, and
  • How that money will be managed.

Danish Minister for Climate and Energy Connie Hedegaard, incoming COP15 president, says Copenhagen is a “window of opportunity” which should not be missed. She is optimistic that after months of political stalemate key countries are now coming forward with new targets. “In that sense,” she says, “Copenhagen has already delivered results.”

Connie Hedegaard, Danish Minister for Climate and Energy

Connie Hedegaard, Danish Minister for Climate and Energy

To achieve stabilisation of CO2 emissions by 2030, The International Energy Agency’s annual World Energy Outlook for 2009 divides the world into several sectors and considers policy options for each. It looks at what the power sector could achieve under “a plausible set of commitments and policies which could emerge.” The IEA suggests “much faster roll-out of renewables and nuclear including urgent investment in carbon capture and storage,” while the richest countries should “facilitate the transfer of low-carbon technologies – through international sector agreements and the purchase of carbon credits and other measures.”

This would need some $12 trillion beyond the ’business as usual’ scenario, mostly for investment in energy efficiency, modernization of transport and construction of low-carbon power generation. The cost would be offset by savings in pollution control amounting to $100 billion a year. Investment in nuclear power could be boosted by $125 billion in 2010-2020, increasing to $491 billion in the decade to 2030, says the IEA. This would be in addition to growth already planned for nuclear power and would save an extra 1.87 billion tons in emissions a year.

AREVA’s Nuclear Asset

Nuclear isn’t the only solution for clean energy generation, but there is no solution without nuclear. As world leader in nuclear power and the only company to cover all industrial activities in this field, AREVA offers solutions throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. With more than forty years’ experience, its integrated business model in nuclear power is a major asset.

AREVA’s activities encompass everything from uranium exploration, mining and processing, reactor design, construction and maintenance, expended fuel and waste management. With this unique organization the group is able to meet the needs of utilities for CO2-free power generation.

Representing about 15% of the global electricity mix, nuclear power reduces the world’s emissions by almost 10% each year, avoiding the release of some 2.1 billion tons of CO2. Installed nuclear generating capacity will double by 2030, and AREVA is working to offer reactors suited to the requirements of each country.

AREVA is also developing next-generation fuel assemblies for light water reactors and, as part of an international research program, is working on Generation IV nuclear reactors, which are expected to increase power plant yields considerably.

Look for Part II tomorrow!

September 4, 2009 | 4:30 pm

Attention for Off-Shore Wind Turbines Grows

802501Renewable energy – It’s a hot theme right now as states look at their future energy options, and wind is considered an excellent solution for producing electricity while protecting the environment. Just yesterday, the Daily Press of Newport News wrote a piece about how the “prospect of harvesting energy from the steady wind off the coast of Virginia appears to be gaining momentum.”

With a much per unit larger capacity than its onshore cousins, offshore wind turbines are increasingly under consideration as states like Virginia look at renewable energy sources they want to see developed.

AREVA is part of this conversation too, with our continually maturing renewables portfolio. This includes our 5 MW offshore wind turbines which we design and manufacture through our Multibrid subsidiary at our facility in Germany. Today, six of these turbines have been installed at Germany’s first offshore wind farm.

As part of the article’s look at wind in Virginia, the Daily Press identified AREVA as one of the companies examining potential projects in Virginia. In fact, AREVA is considering possible locations for wind farms throughout North America, in particular along the U.S. East Coast and Great Lakes.

Regarding possibilities in Virginia “at this point it’s still exploratory. But based on what we see, there’s certainly the potential and opportunity here if the offshore wind market should move ahead in the U.S.,” said AREVA spokeswoman Denise Woernle.

Another dimension of the AREVA renewable portfolio is ADAGE, a joint-venture with Duke Energy. ADAGE is currently developing 50 MW biopower (biomass to electricity) plants for construction in the U.S. and has already announced its first proposed site for Hamilton County, Florida.

For more information about ADAGE and biopower, check out the site here.

To read the rest of the piece, check out Daily Press article here.

April 17, 2009 | 3:53 pm

AREVA Well Positioned to Advance Smart Grid Initiatives

smart-grid-boulder001We’d like to congratulate the Obama administration on their announcement yesterday to fund “smart grid” initiatives to develop a more efficient and secure electrical grid. We’re going to actively support the administration’s initiative by working with customers to demonstrate and deploy smart grid technology. As you may know, AREVA is a leader in the United States in the development of smart grid systems, as well as in renewable and other carbon-free energy solutions.

We’ve developed a variety of products and services to improve grid reliability, enable integration of renewables into the grid, and facilitate greater customer control over energy use. We’ve also created a special task force bringing together the capabilities of several business units, to create comprehensive solutions that will accelerate the Obama administration’s smart grid initiatives. In addition, we’re investing in R&D projects at our Center of Excellence in Redmond, Wash., which will further advance the state of smart grid technology.

“AREVA is committed to achieving the goals of the smart grid development projects. As the proven leader in Utility Grid Management Systems and with two-thirds of electric utilities in North America using AREVA equipment, our company is well positioned to help advance these important national initiatives,” said Jacques Besnainou, President of AREVA Inc.

The deployment of smart grid technologies also will allow for greater utilization of renewable energy resources, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing domestic energy security. We expect that our collaboration with electric utilities on smart grid deployment will create a significant number of new jobs across the United States.

March 31, 2009 | 3:00 pm

Renewables, Including Wind, Represent Growing Part of AREVA’s Business

By Jarret Adams

Today’s announcement of a memorandum of understanding for 80 offshore wind turbines for AREVA’s subsidiary Multibrid signals a major step forward for our renewable business.  Apart from the fact that this will be a contract worth over $900 million for AREVA, it reinforces our position as a major player in the renewables sector.

These wind turbines will be located off the North Sea coast of Germany, but AREVA is looking for opportunities for new business at various locations in North America. Our company remains one of a handful capable of producing the 5 MW offshore wind turbines.

AREVA also is involved in other renewable sectors, such as biopower (biomass to electricity). We have constructed 100 biomass facilities around the world and are now looking to build more in the United States.

Last September, AREVA and Duke Energy formed ADAGE, a joint venture focused on providing biopower solutions to U.S. electricity customers. Since its formation, ADAGE has moved forward with the goal of building 10-12 facilities over the next six years. In February, ADAGE announced a preliminary agreement with Energy Northwest to market 50 MW biopower facilities in Pacific Northwest.

Developing solutions for power generations with a small environmental impact from renewables, such as wind and biomass, along with clean nuclear energy is a main focus of our business.

March 12, 2009 | 1:03 pm

Carbon is the Enemy

by Laurence Pernot

CarbonWe are facing a revolution, a global energy revolution, the third one in our recent history. The first took place in the 19th century, featuring coal and steam; the second flourished during the 20th century and was dominated by oil and electricity. Today, factors of the third revolution are:

  • Limited fossil resources;
  • Strong economic growth in emerging countries;
  • Demographic growth, with 3 billion additional people by 2050; and
  • Climate change.

In revolutionary times, you always have the option to choose the right side or the wrong one. As far as the current energy crisis is concerned, choosing the wrong side means giving up. Considering that inertia to make right choice can appear so great when we talk about energy issues that the fight is lost in advance. It often means making the easiest choice, even if it is the worst one.

read more…

March 11, 2009 | 11:44 am

Nuclear and Renewable Energy: Complementary, not Opposed

by Laurence Pernot

At AREVA, we strongly believe that there is no solution to the energy and climate crisis that doesn’t involve nuclear energy, even if nuclear energy alone isn’t the solution.

We hear your objections: If it’s so obvious that nuclear energy has to be part of the solution, why is it still ignored in places like some countries in Europe, where they’re determined to fight climate change and reduce CO2 emissions? Why has a country like Germany, where people have such a highly-developed environmental awareness, decided to progressively get rid of nuclear energy?

Why? Because, in some parts of the world, when it comes to nuclear energy, ideology still remains stronger than reality.

Of course, any expert in energy knows that renewables – except biomass and geothermal – are not baseload energy sources. Solar and wind power plants need coal- or gas-fired back-up plants. It’s common sense: anyone can tell you that people aren’t going to stop using electricity when the wind dies down, or on a cloudy day, or after sunset. We need dependable, reliable power 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

One telling example: France emits 8 times less CO2 per kilowatt-hour than Denmark, a country where the share of renewables is close to 30%. However remarkable the development of renewables in Denmark may be, a huge part of its power still has to be generated from the burning of fossil fuels. That example clearly shows how unwise it is to oppose nuclear and renewable energy, as many nations have done for decades, and as opponents to nuclear energy still do. It’s much more realistic to consider renewables and nuclear power as complementary – two essential parts of our 21st-century energy equation.

Our conviction is at the end of the 21st century, when we look back, we’ll see that one of the main features of the century was the development of a diverse range of non-carbon-emitting sources of energy, including renewables and nuclear. Discarding nuclear energy a priori due to ideological blindness or unfounded fears would be both nonsensical and dangerous.

March 2, 2009 | 7:57 am

Quote of the Day

From George Monbiot at The Guardian, an argument that nuclear power should be paired with renewables in the clean energy gameplan:

It’s true that my position has changed. As the likely effects of climate change have become clearer, nuclear power, by comparison, has come to seem less threatening.[...]

So why contemplate nuclear power at all? Why not, as Merrick suggests, decarbonise our economy solely through energy efficiency and renewable power?

In principle it could – just about – be done, as Mark Barrett at University College London and the authors of the ZeroCarbonBritain report suggest.

But as you load more renewable energy onto the grid, it becomes more expensive and harder to manage. As Mark Barrett, ZeroCarbonBritain and the German government have shown, you could have a balanced, reliable electricity supply consisting largely of renewables. But the balancing costs will rise a good deal as the penetration of renewables increases beyond, say, 60 or 70%. It is also worth noting that some of the more ambitious renewables proposals will take at least as long to implement as a new nuclear programme. We could decarbonise the electricity supply quicker and more cheaply if we complement renewables with other sources.

In the United States, nuclear energy provides about 70% of CO2-free power generation; most of the rest is from hydropower. These are important numbers to keep in mind as we consider how we will face these challenges.