Energy in Action: Freezer Pop Stick, Paper Clip, Rubber Band, and Cardstock

As an example of learning new STEM concepts, fourth-grader Brooklyn Fullam proudly shows her potential energy helicopter.

As an example of learning new STEM concepts, fourth-grader Brooklyn Fullam proudly shows her potential energy helicopter.

How are these items an incredible demonstration of potential and kinetic energy designed for elementary school students?

More than 100 fourth-graders at Carl A. Furr Elementary School in Concord, N.C., recently learned about energy and engineering from eight North American Young Generation in Nuclear (NAYGN) volunteers from AREVA, including two summer interns. The volunteers led a presentation and demonstrations, and helped students build their own potential energy helicopters using basic materials.

In addition to teaching the students about energy and engineering, the two sessions gave AREVA engineers and interns an opportunity to practice their presentation skills and make a lasting impression on future scientists and engineers.

The helicopter activity made a lasting impression on at least one student – and his parent. In a short note to AREVA, the parent wrote: “Thank you for coming to our son’s classroom. He so enjoyed the lesson on energy and has been flying his helicopter all over the house.”

AREVA is committed to supporting science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education through outreach activities with schools in the communities in which our employees live and work. Though school is now out for summer break, AREVA is continuing to promote STEM education by supporting activities offered to local teachers through the Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools STEMersion Program and to young girls through Project Scientist Academy at UNC Charlotte, a program that supports interest in STEM careers for girls ages 5-15.